Volunteer - BAUDL

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Bay Area Volunteers

The Bay Area Urban Debate League is a non-profit organization that works with San Francisco Bay Area public school districts to create and maintain debate teams in under-resourced urban schools. Believing that debate increases students' academic performance and trains them to become community leaders, the BAUDL works to make competitive policy debate available to Bay Area high school students. The BAUDL hosts six tournaments during the academic year, reaching more than 270 Bay Area students.

Our tournaments depend on a pool of volunteer judges who judge debate rounds between our talented participants. We are seeking volunteer judges who are energetic, encouraging, and sensitive to the challenges facing urban students. 

Urban debate changes lives. In schools where students have little more than a fifty percent chance of graduating, our debaters graduate on time and graduate prepared to succeed in college and life. You make this happen. Urban debate if fueled by the investment that volunteers like you make in our students. We couldn't do this without you.

A: Sign-Up for an Upcoming Event

We're currently recruiting volunteers for the following shifts:

B. Join Our Volunteer Pool

The best way to stay involved is to join our volunteer pool. You'll be the first to know about new volunteer opportunities throughout the year.

Thank You

Thank you getting involved with urban debate! This life-changing work could not happen passionate, dedicated people like you!

Our Work

As the national leader of the urban debate movement, the National Association for Urban Debate Leagues (NAUDL) is a successful and rapidly growing organization that works to support debate programming nationally and at local leagues in 22 cities across the United States. NAUDL is committed to the concept that debate is an academic sport that builds reading, research, communication and critical thinking skills, all essential for closing the achievement gap in urban middle and high schools.

PARTNERS